approvedcmi@gmail.com

A variety of methods can be used to reduce radon in homes. Sealing cracks and other openings in the foundation is a basic part of most approaches to radon reduction. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to limit radon entry.  Sealing alone has not been shown to lower radon levels significantly or consistently.

  In most cases, a system with a vent pipe and fan is used to reduce radon.  These "sub-slab depressurization" systems do not require major changes to your home. Similar systems can also be installed in homes with crawlspaces.  These systems prevent radon gas from entering the home from below the concrete floor and from outside the foundation.  Radon mitigation contractors may use other methods that may also work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and other factors. 

Radon-resistant techniques work.  When installed properly and completely, these simple and inexpensive passive techniques can help to reduce radon levels.  In addition, installing them at the time of construction makes it easier to reduce radon levels further if the passive techniques don't reduce radon levels below 4 pCi/L.  Radon-resistant techniques may also help to lower moisture levels and those of other soil-gases.  

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas.

You cannot see, smell or taste radon. But it still may be a problem in your home.  When you breathe air containing radon, you increase your risk of getting lung cancer.  In fact, the Surgeon General of the United States has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today.  If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.  Contact Approved Home Inspections, Inc to test your home today.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer.


The EPA recommends:

If you are buying a home or selling your home, have it tested for radon.

For a new home, ask if radon-resistant construction features were used and if the home has been tested.

Fix the home if the radon level is 4 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L) or higher.

Radon levels less than 4 pCi/L still pose a risk, and in many cases, may be reduced.

Take steps to prevent device interference when conducting a radon test.

The EPA estimates that radon causes about 21,000 of cancer deaths in the U.S. each year.


U.S. Surgeon General's Health Advisory

"Indoor radon gas is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, and breathing it over prolonged periods can present a significant health risk to families all over the country.  It's important to know that this threat is completely preventable.  Radon can be detected with a simple test, and fixed through well-established venting techniques."

 January 2005 

Testing is the only way to find out your home's radon levels. The EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. If you find that you have high radon levels, there are ways to fix a radon problem. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels.

​​(248) 845-8839

Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon 

​​Radon is a radioactive gas that has been found in homes all over the United States. It comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water, and gets into the air you breathe. Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above, and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Radon can also enter your home through well water. Your home can trap radon inside.

Any home can have a radon problem, including new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. In fact, you and your family are most likely to get your greatest radiation exposure at home. That is where you spend most of your time.

Nearly one out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level (4 pCi/L or more).  


Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. The EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon.

You cannot predict radon levels based on state, local, or neighborhood radon measurements.  Do not rely on radon test results taken in other homes in the neighborhood to estimate the radon level in your home.  Homes which are next to each other can have different radon levels.  Testing is the only way to find out what your home's radon level is.